Introduction

On this blog I will post stories I have written, most of this stories are mundane science fiction, a sub-genre of science fiction. Mundane science fiction are stories set in the near future and either on Earth or in our Solar System, further this type of science fiction is based on the current state of scientific knowledge. Although I might deviate a little bit of the rules of mundane science fiction, you will not find “sword and planet”, “faster than light” or similar stories.

Space colonization is a central theme of most of the stories I will place on this site, in particular I will deal with the political and social issues related to space colonization. Further I will explore in my stories different types of societies and new ways of life. All kind of emerging technologies will be discussed in the stories, but mostly within the context of their consequences for society. As general rule I will not use hyper-links in the stories in this blog. If necessary I place at the end of a story a short list of hyper-links about the key concepts of that story.

Since I realize that due to the length of the stories, scrolling this page for stories will be cumbersome, I have created an overview page with a link together with a short summary for each story posted on this blog.

Comments are welcome, but I will moderate all comments and I alone will decide on whether a comment will be approved.

The Detective’s Dilemma

I have recently read the Cormoran Strike novels by “Robert Galbraith” (who is actually J. K. Rowling) and I will discuss those books in more detail soon. However, in this writing I want to discuss what I would call the detective’s dilemma, something which came up when reading The Cuckoo’s Calling. Continue reading →

Windhaven

Windhaven by George R. R. Martin and Lisa Tuttle is described on Wikipedia as a “science fiction and fantasy” novel. This triggers me, really. As one might know, I endorse a strong demarcation between both genres of speculative fiction. Only almost everyone has his or her own definitions of science fiction and fantasy, and as always with definitions, discussions on this topic cannot be settled in a definite way. Continue reading →

Immortality: Staume’s version

For part one, see here

In this second installment of my series on immortality, I will discuss David Staume’s book The Atheist Afterlife. Like Frank Tipler Staume seeks to develop a concept of the afterlife that is consistent with modern physics and both authors deliberate avoid a particular religious start point of their analysis. Nevertheless Staume’s theory on immortality is quite different Tipler’s. Continue reading →

Some announcements

There will be a view changes on this site. First of all, from now on stories* will be published only in the weekend (according to CET). Secondly fiction will be published once or twice a month. Reviews articles and general musings (“contemplation”) might be published at any time I see fit.

Though I will resume work on this site, publications will be infrequent. I will not guarantee anything will be published at all, but I will try to publish at least one story a month, most likely some flash fiction.

*This includes the background articles.

The Interview

The immigration officer was quite bored when a took a nicotine gum from its package in order to put it in his mouth. He had interviewed more than two dozens of prospective immigrants that day and it was already late. Nevertheless he was not yet able to leave his office as there was one applicant left to be interviewed. While he was chewing the immigration officer asked the man sitting on the opposite side of his desk: Continue reading →

The Bones of Mengele

Apparently the bones of one of the most notorious Nazi criminals, Josef Mengele, are kept at the São Paulo Legal Medical Institute and are now used to teach students of the University of São Paulo’s medical school. Unlike Mengele, those Nazis executed after the Neurenberg trial were cremated and their ashes were dispersed in a local river. Hence Mengele’s DNA is, theoretically, available. Continue reading →

Spacers versus terrestrials

As an avid fan of Asimov I borrow certain concepts from the great master of science fiction (SF, not “sci-fi”). The most important concept I have borrowed into my own work, in particular within the context of the Elysia universe, is the whole Spacer thing. Continue reading →

Alice v. Bob

In August 2065 the civil bench of the Elysian Supreme Court issued a notorious verdict, commonly known as the Alice v. Bob 2065 case. Continue reading →

Seasteading and refugees

My favorite science fiction author as a child is Tais Teng. In one of his books he wrote about the “Atlantic Empire”, a floating nation of (former) refugees. At the time I found it an exiting idea, a sea-based society, but I did not believe that it would become reality. Continue reading →

Dune

I have now read all six books of the original Dune series by Frank Herbert. I won’t bother to give a summary of the books here, those can be found on the internet, rather I will present here my impressions of these classic works of science fiction. Continue reading →