Author Archive: Mordanicus

Country files: Faiakea

Name: The Republic of Faiakea

Primary location: Main Asteroid Belt

Form of government: unitary parliamentary republic

Capital city: Ogygia

Economic system: warrantism, distributism

Official ideology/state religion: hedonic realism

Founded: 2057

Role in international relations: small power

Main allies: none, isolationist state

Main rivals: most other spacer nations

National Anthem: the joy of work

National sport: paintball hunting

UK elections and Brexit

Here my short review of the UK 2017 general election.

Results

Though May’s Conservative Party did manage to increase its popular vote by 5.5 percent point to 42 percent, the party lost its slim majority but with 318 seats, they remain the largest party. However, May did call this election in increase the Conservative majority in the House of Commons, this result is very disappointingly. Continue reading →

The Lunar Radio Observatory 2

1

Fifty years after the Lunar Radio Observatory was completed, radio-astronomer Cyrus landed on the far side of the Moon. He would spent the next six months on Earth’s only natural satellite. The lunar base which would be his home during this period, was located about 25 kilometers to the south of the Daedelus crater. Cyrus’ job was simple, he had to ensure the LRO was operated properly and to manage the collection of information. Continue reading →

Butanol

Butanol is quite similar to gasoline and can be produced from biological waste. As such it might become an essential part in the future of the global energy mix.

Immortality: Tipler vs Staume

In this final installment of our series on immortality, we will compare the theories of Tipler and Staume. Though both seek to develop a concept of life after death not based on belief or wishfulthinking but grounded in science and physiscs in particular, their respective theories are, however, as complete opposites as is logically possible. As far as I could see, there is no way to merge these two into a single theory of immortality. Continue reading →

Review of Shadowmarch

I have recently completed reading the Shadowmarch series by US author Tad Williams. This fantasy series consists of four volumes: ShadowmarchShadowplay, Shadowrise and Shadowheart. Continue reading →

Cormoran Strike

As I said in a previous post I have recently read the Cormoran Strike novels by Robert Galbraith. It is pity that those books would not have sold well, if it had not be known that Galbraith is no one but J. K. Rowling herself, as the Strike novels are well-written detective stories. And to be honest I believe these books are far better than the Harry Potter series. Continue reading →

The Detective’s Dilemma

I have recently read the Cormoran Strike novels by “Robert Galbraith” (who is actually J. K. Rowling) and I will discuss those books in more detail soon. However, in this writing I want to discuss what I would call the detective’s dilemma, something which came up when reading The Cuckoo’s Calling. Continue reading →

Windhaven

Windhaven by George R. R. Martin and Lisa Tuttle is described on Wikipedia as a “science fiction and fantasy” novel. This triggers me, really. As one might know, I endorse a strong demarcation between both genres of speculative fiction. Only almost everyone has his or her own definitions of science fiction and fantasy, and as always with definitions, discussions on this topic cannot be settled in a definite way. Continue reading →

Immortality: Staume’s version

For part one, see here

In this second installment of my series on immortality, I will discuss David Staume’s book The Atheist Afterlife. Like Frank Tipler Staume seeks to develop a concept of the afterlife that is consistent with modern physics and both authors deliberate avoid a particular religious start point of their analysis. Nevertheless Staume’s theory on immortality is quite different Tipler’s. Continue reading →