Tag Archives: energy

Energy super power – down under

The Guardian has an interesting article on a project, Sun Cable, to export Australian solar power to Singapore. Currently Australia is one of the largest exporters of coal, also exports a great deal of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and is a major supplier of uranium – though the country itself has no nuclear power plants. Continue reading →

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Future Fuel

The age of (cheap) oil is doomed in the long run, even if we do not care about climate change, as petroleum is a finite resource which would eventually be depleted. However, our modern industrialized society requires a lot of energy and without it our planet cannot sustain a ten billion population. Continue reading →

Food for robots

Robots resembling humans are no longer purely science fiction, though we are far away from true stand in replacements of ourselves. Nevertheless, it reasonable to assume that over the course of this century they become a greater part of daily life. One important point we need to address is the energy supply for our lookalikes. Continue reading →

OTEC and Syn Fuel

In a previous post I discussed the potential of Ocean Thermal Energy conversion to meet Japan’s energy demand in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Below a video on how this method of energy generation works. Continue reading →

Ocean thermal energy conversion for Japan?

Though this an old post by me, I think it still relevant.

Lagrangian Republican Association

Introduction

On march 11, 2011, Japan was hit by an earth quake and a tsunami which resulted in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Consequently the public opinion in Japan turned 180 degrees against nuclear power. Even their government began to consider a nuclear free future. But Japan is so heavily dependent on nuclear power, that last summer two nuclear power plants had to be restarted in the face of massive public opposition. The question of this post is what are the alternatives for Japan? I will discuss solar power, wind power and Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). [However, both wind power and OTEC are in fact indirect forms of solar energy since both winds and the oceans are powered by the Sun.]

Wind and Solar power

These are the “classical” kinds of alternative energy sources. Both options require a lot of space, and the intensity of solar radiation…

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Butanol

Butanol is quite similar to gasoline and can be produced from biological waste. As such it might become an essential part in the future of the global energy mix.

Two-in-one: Carbon capture and energy storage

Burning fossil fuels increases the amount of CO2 in our atmosphere, with serious consequences such as ocean acidification and an increased greenhouse effect. Reducing CO2 emission is important, though it would still leave much CO2 still in the atmosphere. Actually we should look for ways to remove that from the air, one way to do so would be reforesting.

Continue reading →